How Often Should You Bathe Your Dog

0 Comment

Figuring out how often you should bathe your dog is actually not as straightforward as you think. The worst thing that you can do is to assume that there is some sort of one-size-fits-all, cookie-cutter answer to this and, let me tell you, if that is your attitude, chances are you doing your dog a big disservice.

Please understand that the bathing needs of a dog that is fairly small and easily cleaned and tends to stay clean is much different from a dog that is long-haired, tends to stink up and is very active and is fairly large. See the difference?

The problem here is that a lot of people believe that there is this one-size-fits-all, across-the-board type of solution and they end up putting their dogs through a lot of stress. Your dog’s skin, just like your skin, is its largest organ. Usually, when we think of organs, we think about the stuff that’s inside us that helps us breathe, processes our blood, cleans our blood, and all that good stuff.

However, you also have to look at the fact that your skin is an organ because it does many important functions like help modulate your internal temperature, prevent diseases as well as detect your external circumstances. It is like some sort of sensor that is spread out throughout your body.

If you treat your skin wrong or you subject it to different types of stresses, you end up degrading it. That’s the bottom line. Maybe it starts to shed or you trigger processes that basically leads to early shedding or bad skin condition overall. This translates to nasty pet hair, matted fur, even bad odors. All of these can combine to produce even worse health risks for your pet.

How bad can things get? Just think about one word – parasites. That’s right. Your pet can attract lice, fleas, and all that other bad stuff. So, it’s really important to understand that you have to bathe your dog based on what works for your individual dog.

I know that’s kind of tricky because it’s easy to assume that if your dog is, let’s say, a Chihuahua or a Labrador Retriever that the bathing schedule that works for one member of that breed will work for all other members of the breed.

Generally speaking, this is on point but you have to customize your dog’s bathing schedule ultimately based on your pet’s schedule. Just as every human being on this planet is very different from each other with their own different personal differences, dogs develop their own personal preferences and habits across time. So, don’t deny the reality of individuality to your dog. At the very least, it’s a good idea to pay close attention to how your dog responds the next time you bathe it.

In fact, I would recommend that you conduct different experiments regarding scheduling. Maybe start with giving your dog a bath once a week in the morning. See how that works out. If that doesn’t work out all that well, try giving your dog a weekly bath in the evening.

If that still doesn’t work out, give your dog a bath sooner in the week. Before you know it, you will hit your stride and you will be able to identify the magic formula for your pet.

This is well worth it because it not only demonstrates how much you love your four-legged companion but it also it also cements your bond with your pet. I know you’re busy; so is everybody. Let’s face it. As much as we hate to admit it, we could spend a little more time with the people and the animals that matters most in our lives. Since your dog is a member of your family, chances are it’s not getting the amount of time it deserves from you.

This is where bathing your dog the right way with the right schedule comes in. Look at it as yet another opportunity to bond with your dog and give it the time, attention, and love it deserves. Remember, there’s absolutely no reason for you to doubt whether your dog loves you. However, there may be doubts going the other way.

When you bathe your dog, you give yourself the opportunity to know your dog better. Your dog gets a chance to see that you can be trusted and that you are really looking out for its needs. Believe me, this can definitely go a long way. A little bit of assurance after all speaks volumes about your priorities and depth of feeling and commitment to your dog.

When you bathe your dog, you also remind yourself of why you chose to get a pooch in the first place. Eventually, you will realize that the reason is not about you but about your pet. In other words, owning a dog and caring for it (like giving it a bath regularly) can help you mature as a person. It can be instructive in terms of personal maturity, commitment, sacrifice, and loyalty.

Let’s put it this way, if your pet loves you to the end with no questions asked, shouldn’t you reflect a little bit of that commitment? Giving your pet a bath is a great way to test your commitment muscles. No joke. Real story.

Think of it this way, if you are going to have issues committing to giving your pooch a bath at the right place at the right time on a regular basis, are you really ready to commit to another human being in a mutually loving relationship?

I know this is kind of a hard personal question to ask. Unfortunately, a lot of people don’t bother to ask themselves this type of question and that’s why they continue to be stuck in frustrating, unfulfilling, and, often, meaningless relationships.

Giving your dog a bath is not just a simple matter of water, soap, and cleaning. It goes deeper than that. It actually speaks volumes about you.